Tag Archives: Rade

Hands on: ASUS ROG G20CB (Sponsored)

Pre-built computers for gaming weren’t always a viable option for your hardcore gamer – they just didn’t have the power to run your favourite games. And if you weren’t confident enough to build your own PC, you probably didn’t want to sink some of your hard-earned cash into a puzzle that can go wrong.

Happily, pre-built gaming PC’s are now becoming reliable for gamers who want a “set it and forget it” option. ASUS’s ROG G20CB is a great looking computer, with the power to back it up – and it’s VR Compatible.

I don’t know what I was expecting when it arrived at my house. Was it going to be a huge tower like my gaming rig? Would it be a tiny case, filled to the brim with processing power? Despite the enormous packing box, it was actually somewhere in between.

While the ROG G20CB 9.5L tower matches the aesthetics that the previous ASUS ROG items I’ve reviewed, it’s definitely something special. It looks aerodynamic, masculine and stealthy – which isn’t my jam. But the front panel has twin colour-changing LEDs hidden behind an alien ruins-esque design when the PC is running. It was an odd match to the rather angular edges on the case, but it was a nice thing to catch your eye mid-gaming session.

Around the back you’ve a variety of 2.0 and 3.0 USB ports to ensure the quickest data transfer and enough room for all your peripherals. Alongside a HDMI-out port (more on this later), LAN port, a Kensington Lock (so people don’t run off with your computer at a LAN) and 7.1 audio.

Under the hood, the ROG G20CB I got to play with has an Intel i7 Processor, NVIDIA GeForce GTX1080 8GB, 8GB DDR4 RAM with room to expand up to 32GB RAM and two hard drives (1TB SATA 7200RPM and 512GB SSD). All this hardware makes for a really nice computer.

All of that works together to bring one of the more impressive features for the G20CB. My review computer came with an Oculus Rift headset for some VR gaming goodness.

I’ve played with VR in the past at PAX and it wasn’t the best experience. The Oculus dev kits were awful in hindsight and didn’t sit well with my migraine-prone brain. Luckily, the retail kits are a marked improvement. To really test out the playability of the Oculus, I invited around a few friends to enjoy some games and drinks, and it was definitely a great night. The selection of games I had to pick from wasn’t huge (early access games aren’t my jam), but I’d managed to pick a few winners and the ROG G20CB handled them perfectly. “Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes” was great fun in VR, when you’ve got four people sharing one set of instructions and screaming conflicting things at you.

@kristyyleighh’s boyfriend is being mindfucked by Oculus

A video posted by Rade (@gamer_rade) on

But one game “Emily Wants to Play”, was the most fun to play with the Oculus headset. The horror survival game is based around creepy dolls and jump scares. I’d show you the footage of my boyfriend noping the hell on out of there but the footage seems to have disappeared…

Creepy, right?

This computer isn’t without its faults however. In larger computers, you either have a small, external power supply (think laptop size) or it’s contained within the computer itself. Because the ASUS ROG G20CB case is quite slim and small, the power supply is external and it’s huge. The G20CB power supply unit actually has two separate power supplies to power this beast (180W + 230W). If it was my regular computer, I’d be concerned about it getting quite warm under my desk.

Another issue I had was setting up the Oculus. The computer has 2 HDMI ports; one on the motherboard and one on the GPU – but the one on the GPU comes disabled. This isn’t a huge issue if you only need one HDMI port, or know how to reenable the port on your GPU, but if you’re a “set it and forget it” kind of person (no shame in your game) and you did buy this to use a VR headset, it could become a bit of a pain. This isn’t necessarily an issue with the computer, but I hate finding these things out after the fact and having to waste time fixing a problem that shouldn’t be an issue in the first place.

Consumers may have trouble with the investment needed with the ROG G20CB. The computer I got to test will set you back a cool AUD$3999 – that’s no small amount of cash to part with. The ROG G20CB has been designed to age well and not need as frequent hardware upgrades as your homebrew computer, thus the larger than usual price tag. Again, you’re paying for the “set it and forget it” PC option. If you can get past the price hurdle, this computer would be an investment that I think would make the most hardcore gamers happy.

The last issue I had was a total user fault: It took me 20 minutes, some adult supervision, and a Google search to figure out how I turn it on. As I mentioned above, the front panel of the computer has an intricate design which disguises the power button quite well. I was worried I’d have to email my friends at Asus and tell them I couldn’t review the computer they’d sent me because I couldn’t figure out how it worked! It’s actually quite embarrassing for someone who does this for a living…

The Asus ROG G20CB is a big investment for any gamer, but with a variety of specifications available through the website, you’re able to get the best bang for your buck. While the issues I had were minor (and mostly my fault),it’s still a great computer if you’re just looking for a computer that’s going to stand up to the best games for the next few years without showing its age. It’s sleek, small, and portable. It made a great PC to have attached to our TV in our loungeroom, and would make a great PC for any study or gaming den.

Listen @asusau, my cat has claimed the G20CB as her own. I can’t send it back without her.

A photo posted by Rade (@gamer_rade) on

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Product Review: Gamehook (Producted provided by MobileZap)

I’ll be the first to admit that I’m not a massive handheld or mobile gamer. After being spoiled for choice with my PC and consoles, it feels like a bit of a downgrade playing stuff on my Nintendo 3DS or my phone. When Chris from MobileZap emailed me last week saying that he had a nifty toy for my phone that I could play with, it definitely grabbed my interest.IMG_0036[1]

What crossed my desk is called the Gamehook. It looks like a phone cradle you’d find in any car, but you can attach a PS3 controller into the bottom and play Android (Sorry iOS users) games wired, or wirelessly.

(Entirely off-topic: While downloading a game to demo for this review, I spent several giddy minutes controlling my phone with the PS3 controller. The integration between the controller and the Android software is seamless. Whether this is because my phone is ALSO a Sony product is unknown, but it’s done rather well.)

IMG_0037[1]The Gamehook is designed to work with any Android device under 5.5 inches. The part of the Gamehook that holds your phone expands with the push of a button to hold phones on the higher end of that 5.5 inch scale. With my being just under 5.5 inches (5.47 inches to be exact), my Xperia needed all the room it could get! The phone dock should still hold a phone with a case and there’s enough room for bulker phones to sit comfortably in the dock.

The cradle isn’t anything special to look at from the front. “Gamehook™” is displayed on the bottom of the phone cradle and the whole product is black. The back has a nice carbon fibre pattern on the back, which is a nice style touch, but when you’re working with something so simple, there isn’t much you can do with the looks. I wouldn’t mind seeing it in other colours like red, purple or green but again, these are just small style choices.

Putting the PS3 controller was a little confusing to start with, but once I played around with it for a while, getting the controller in and out of the cradle is pretty easy.

The only problem I had with the entire time I review the product was trying to find mobile games that had gamepad support without resorting to a Google search. Most of the popular game choices aren’t compatible with gamepads and the couple of games I tried weren’t either, which was surprising with games like Sonic Racing Transformed and other racing-themed games.IMG_0038[1]

The Gamehook is definitely something I didn’t think I’d use, but with the right games, it’s the perfect way to introduce a PC or console gamer into the world of mobile gaming. The device can be a little top heavy, but that’s par for the course when you’re using a whole phone just for the screen. It’s going to sit happily with the rest of my gaming peripherals and I’m happy to add it to the collection.

Thanks to MobileZap for sending me out this genius little product for me to play with.

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South Park: The Stick of Truth (Australian Censored version)

 

Before I start, this post contains spoilers. If you haven’t finished the game, click here and be redirected.

Spoilers

South Park: The Stick of Truth (TSoT) had a development story akin to that of Duke Nukem Forever; developer issues, bankrupt companies and constant setbacks. However, with the help of Ubisoft, TSoT was finally released this March and to my surprise, it’s hilariously good. And this comes from someone who isn’t a South Park fan (there are dozens of us! DOZENS!)

Set in a Dungeons and Dragons style adventure game, the turn based RPG sees you, The New Kid (Sir Douchebag) go roaming around the neighbourhoods of South Park in search of The Stick of Truth after it was stolen by the Elves from the humans at Kupa Keep.

It is said whoever possesses the Stick controls the universe.

The create-a-character screen is fairly easy to use. You get a basic character and have a limited range of hair and clothes to deck your little adventurer out with. This isn’t a massive issue because along the way, you’ll look new customisation items or buy them from places around town. You also find dyes to make your costumes individual.

The game looks like an episode of South Park, which is what you’d expect. Your characters hop around when they’re walking and everyone looks like they’re made out of pieces of coloured paper. The writing is what you’d expect from a South Park game, too. The magic you’re taught from Cartman is one giant fart joke; Kenny is a princess who “charms” her (?) opponents by flashing some tits (which isn’t even the most disturbing thing in the game) and even the Aliens make an appearance. There are pop culture references a plenty and most of them refer to A Song of Ice and Fire (Game of Thrones) which was spoofed in Season 17 (an episode that even I laughed in.)

Sadly, because I’m playing the Australian version, my game is censored but even that has a South Park flair. Because of the Australian Rating System, R18+ games still have strict guidelines to abide too. We’re not the only country to receive a censored version of the game, but our friends across the creek in New Zealand aren’t censored. Whether this raises discussion about adult content is yet to be seen, but Trey Parker and Matt Stone have made the censorship hilarious and a little easier to deal with.

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Like most RPG’s, TSoT gives you the option to choose a class: Fighter, Mage, Thief or Jew. (Or paladin class for those of us who aren’t Cartman.) The “Jew” class is a tricky one to master but can have massive payouts for a skilled player as you become more powerful the closer you are to death. Combat works well and requires the player to generally press a button at the right time to have the full effect of an attack. You can summon characters you’ve helped through quests to come into combat and fight on your behalf with some hilarious results. The turn-based combat works nicely and gives you time to think up a strategy to defeat harder enemies.

Controls and UI are where I start to feel like the game was ignored. From footage I’ve seen of the PC version, you’re unable to rebind keys; possibly because the game was directly ported from console, but a simple feature like that can turn people off. I know that I like to have a specific key-bind for a lot of games to make it work easier for me. Even on the console, the use of the bumper buttons doesn’t feel natural and some of the magic combinations can be difficult to master because of joystick fiddliness. The controller really doesn’t feel like it was properly utilised for anything other than combat.

The options menu, “Facebook” and inventory tabs looks completely out of place with the rest of the game, too. I’m not sure if it’s some inside joke with hardcore South Park fans, but the almost generic tabs visual is off-putting and can be annoying to use. The game uses at least seven tabs to scroll through for various uses in the game, but trying to figure out where something might be is frustrating.

It’s racist, sexist, silly and painfully self-aware. It pokes fun at Australia, the games industry and fans of the series itself but it doesn’t feel forced or ironic for irony’s sake. A lot of the time you’ll find yourself laughing until you’re crying or in a state of mortified shock that realistically only something related to South Park could get away with. The game is enough of an RPG for fans of that style of game to enjoy and so South Park that it hurts. I almost hate myself a little bit for enjoying it as much as I do. With the few complaints about controls and UI, it’s obviously not a perfect game but it’s better than a lot of games based on a TV or movie franchise. Really, it’s just like playing a very long, unedited episode of South Park and that’s the best thing about it.

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TotalBiscuit, FUN Creators and Critique.

The argument that video games are forms of art has been made several times. An important part of art is the ability to criticise the artist, the art and the art form as a whole. It’s worked that way for centuries with other forms of tradition art.

However, with this new art form come new critics and new artists who aren’t used to taking such “harsh” criticism, even when it’s warranted.

TotalBiscuit on the Cynical Brit YouTube channel is well-known in the gaming industry for his fair, but often highly critical analysis of video games. Last year, after a scathing review of a video game called “Day One Garry’s Incident”, the game’s developer Wild Games filed a copyright claim against the “WTF is…” video in which the review appeared. (It should be noted that TotalBiscuit wasn’t the only critic who slammed the game. His review was just the most prolific.)

After some intense back and forth between the YouTube channel, it was revealed that Wild Games had filed the claim under a false pretence and were forced to apologise to TotalBiscuit for having the video taken down.

The incident revealed some pretty gaping flaws in YouTube’s copyright system.

It seems like history is repeating itself.

After the “WTF Is…  Guise of the Wolf?” appeared on Youtube being highly critical of the game’s mechanics, voice acting and how many bugs were in the game. TB told his audience that this game wasn’t worth the money that it was asking for.

This is where the fun begins. The creators of the game FUN Creators filed a false copyright claim against the video (all videos use Fair Use). TotalBiscuit’s reps sent the developers an email asking why copyright claim was filed and that it’s illegal to file a claim as the video is a critique. The reply email from FUN Creators implied that the review was a paid review by someone else to criticise the game and that they would get their lawyers involved to find out who was behind the review.

TotalBiscuit announced the issue and FUN Creators hit back saying that any emails that were release were faked and not from their studio. Both claims are incredibly serious but only one person was correct. TB again provided proof that Fun Creators were making serious threats against him and his channel.

Finally, at the end of all this, FUN Creators want TB to take down his channel, tweets and pretty much anything related to the incident or they’ll sic their lawyers on the channel and everyone involved.

I try to present these facts without too much bias to allow you to make up your own mind.

Personally, without my journalist or reviewer side kicking in, I’m sick of developers trying to manipulate the system for their advantage and try to remove any critical analysis of their work. Like I said at the beginning of… whatever this is, art is presented without comment and readily for critique. Without it, art has no meaning. Games can present a story and a purpose, but without critique, there can’t be any discussion of the deeper meaning of what the story means for the player or the world.

When more information comes to light, I’ll update this post.

TotalBiscuit logo by Jamspencer on DeviantART.

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Two Games Down, 98 More To Go…

In the month since I started the Steam Challenge, I’ve felt quite overwhelmed. Realising how much time and effort this will require, the size of my list, what I can finish and what I can’t; it’s all a lot to think about!

Some of the pressure has been relieved, thankfully, when this week I finished two games. I know it’s only two games, but it’s a start and sometimes that’s all you need.

This week I finished Mass Effect 2 (no plans to finish Mass Effect 3 since it isn’t in my Steam list, but I’ll probably import my character and actually finish Mass Effect 3… eventually) and a texty-point-and-clicky RPG called Monsters Love You.

My Mum asked me about this challenge recently. I explained to her the basic rules and regulations I’ve imposed on myself and what I’ll be doing. Her second question was “How many games do you need to play?”

“Well, I’ve got 100 games in my list and I’ve figured that I can play at least half of them before I have to start looking at games that I can’t actually finish.”

While my Mum doesn’t necessarily understand my work, her interest in it (or feigning of) is nice, too. Hopefully with the coming months and more games being completed, she’ll be my own personal cheer-squad.

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Steam Challenge: Humble Bundles, Steam Games and the Internet Plots Against Me.

I actually think the Internet is working against me this year. When I decided to start the Steam Challenge, the first thing people said was “What about Humble Bundles!?” Ah, Humble Bundles…

If you’re not a gamer and don’t know what a Humble Bundle is, they’re a group of games that you purchase for whatever price you think they’re worth. The money you spend goes to charity. It’s a pretty cool idea. Some people just pay over the recommended price to get the extra goodies, but I’ve seen donations for games upwards of thousands of dollars.

So while I’ve been doing the Steam Challenge, I’ve pretty much ignored the Humble Bundle stuff on social media and such so that I won’t be tempted to buy anything. And then this happened:

 bundle

A text message from Tyr (the boyfriend) telling me about the new bundle and its games.  Apparently, the boyfriend has joined the evil forces of the Internet in trying to tempt me with new games. I went to look at what games the Codemasters Bundle included because apparently I’m a giant idiot who likes to tempt myself. Thankfully, the only games that really appealed were games I already had (thankfully!)

Humble Bundle: 0. Rade: 1.

In other news…

I’ve started Mass Effect 2, Peggle Deluxe, Plants vs. Zombies and Half-Life 2. I think that with two story-heavy games, Peggle and PvZ break up the long hours of game play. The list of games I’m playing is available here if you’ve got suggestions on what I should play!

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Steam Challenge: Week 1

Half a week in to the Steam Challenge and I haven’t completely lost my mind. After the initial freak out and planning stage (which didn’t go well, to be honest), I started playing games from the beginning and making some simple rules for my challenge to follow.

For the challenge to be a little easier to manage, I decided to go through the games I can play. I’ll go through all my games and make sure that I haven’t missed anything, but the list so far contains 52 games which is just over half of my Steam list.

Secondly, I realised that this challenge might interfere with the whole “review” part of my job description. So I add this clause, any game that I have to review doesn’t count towards this challenge. Although, all the games that I review, I buy for myself so that would go against the rules of the challenge.

Lastly, any game that I can’t finish (online games, multiplayer-only games), I will spend at LEAST half an hour playing and I’ll document it with a Let’s Play, to show that I’ve done it. At the end of the challenge (or when I break), I’ll put together a thing and write up what I discovered about gaming. Or something. Maybe I’ll just wax lyrical about crap like I normally do.

Like always, if you’ve got suggestions for what games to play, the list is linked above. Should I play them alphabetically? Short to long?

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Rade Reviews: Depression Quest

Video games have a wonderful way to make people go on great adventures and have new experiences. Often, people use video games to escape something going on in their life. As someone who suffers from depression and anxiety, I use video games as a way to vent my feelings in a safe way that doesn’t cause anyone any harm.

Statistics from Headspace (an organisation in Australia) say that 1 in 5 adolescence will suffer some form of diagnosable depression in their life and that depression also accompanies other mental illnesses like anxiety disorders or substance use disorders.

Zoe Quinn, Patrick Lindsey and Isaac Schakler’s game “Depression Quest” has just been greenlit for sale on Steam and  if you know someone who has depression, but doesn’t understand their way of thinking, or how to interact with them, I highly recommend this game.

From the very beginning, this text “adventure” game warns you that the experience you’re about to have is in no-way light hearted or fun. It’s meant to help people better understand the things that people with depression go through: social stigma, isolation.

The background is grey snow, like you’d see on televisions. While it doesn’t move, it gives off the bleakness that people with mental illness often see in going about their day-to-day lives. Background music plays to add depth; piano notes, I would assume. Mostly in the lower end of the scale which you’d think well suit a rainy day.

When you hit the “begin” button, you’re told information about the character you’re playing. You have a significant other named Alex and a job that you find somewhat boring, but it pays the rent. You and your parents both think you could be doing more with your life, but trying to figure out what that means is difficult.

Depression Quest then starts discussing some feelings that your character is feeling; Guilt, anger and exhaustion from the lack of sleep.

During the day to day events of your character (who doesn’t have a specific sex or name, as it is meant to be you in these shoes), you’re given choices to select from once you’ve read the text. Sometimes the “normal” options will be crossed out and you’ll be forced to choose something that you don’t feel like you would do.

At the end of the page, you’re given a summary of your mental and social situation. Depending on what interactions you choose, your quest will go a different way.

No matter what I say about this short, heart-felt game, I’m torn. On the one hand, I love the simplicity of it. It’s straight to the point and really, that’s what it needs to be. But, it breaks my heart. These “fictional” choices that I’m making are choices that I’ve made in real life myself. Avoiding socialisation with people because I either feel awkward around them or in my own skin, lying to myself about doing work due to a lack of motivation or lack of faith in myself.

In the end, this game will attract two kinds of people: People who already have depression or people who are curious about depression. It’s a heart-breaking and enlightening tale that could help open the eyes of people who think that depression is just something people can shake off and will perhaps, make them take it seriously.

 

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Rade Reviews: Kingdom Hearts 1.5 Remix

Kingdom_Hearts_Crash_Course_part_1

I have a friend who is obsessed with Kingdom Hearts. I think the only thing he’s more obsessed with is Lady Gaga. So, with his obsession in mind and the gift cards I received at Christmas in hand, I thought I’d dive into the world of the Disney-RPG and bought Kingdom Hearts HD 1.5 Remix. This review will be about the first Kingdom Hearts games and if that ends positively, I’ll play through the other games and write about them too.

I should probably note that I never really played the PS2 version of Kingdom Hearts. I mean, I played bits and pieces with my friend, but I never sat down and invested hundreds of hours into it, so this won’t be a comparison of the old and the new. This review is more of a review of the game and not the updated game and ways that the developers have improved graphics, gameplay, controls, etc.

The lynching may now proceed…

Sora, Riku and Kairi live on a tropical island in some non-descript ocean with dreams of sailing away on a home-made raft and visiting other worlds. The plan is suddenly ruined when dark creatures known as The Heartless appear on the island and separate the three friends across the Disney universe. Sora eventually teams up with Goofy and Donald Duck who are trying to find King Mickey, who has suddenly vanished from his castle. The three try to find their friends by visiting the previously unconnected Disney worlds; visiting places like Wonderland (Alice in Wonderland), Halloween Town (The Nightmare before Christmas) and Hundred Acre Wood (Winnie the Pooh). There’s a nice mix of places to visit for every Disney fan.

The first thing you notice about Kingdom Hearts is the musical score since it’s the first thing you hear when you start the game. Composed by Yoko Shimomura, the game features melodies from the Disney movies each world is based on and some wonderful original content. Hikaru Utada lends her voice to “Simple and Clean”. The original compositions for Kingdom Hearts are beautiful and soothing while the recomposed melodies from the Disney movies for the relevant worlds are a nice touch. I found myself singing “Under the Sea” while swimming around the oceans with Ariel.

The animation style and art suits the style of game well. It’s still “gravity-defying hair” enough for Final Fantasy fans to keep them satisfied but the cartoonish art style will keep Disney fans feeling nostalgic. All the different Disney worlds are created to pack the essence of whatever movie they’re inspired by into a few different levels. While the individual worlds themselves are huge, the universe is pretty massive. There are 8 Disney inspired worlds plus the rest of the universe which includes Traverse Town (your “base” for the game), Destiny Islands (where Sora, Riku and Kairi are from) and the two last worlds. With enough gameplay to keep fans of both series’ entertained, the game is incredibly long with just story missions alone. Side quests involving missing 99 Dalmatian puppies, lost pages for Merlin and finding every trinity mark keeps the game going for hours.

Villains come in two flavours: Heartless and classic Disney villains. Maleficent is the brains behind the operation, manipulating the rest of the villains like Jafar, Oogey Boogey, Ursula and the gang. And, of course, she plays the part perfectly.

The creatures you’ll encounter during the levels are The Heartless. Devoid of a heart (no, really!?), they’re drawn to Sora, his Keyblade and his pure heart. They range from small shadows to giant monsters and all want to steal the hearts of those around them and their difficulty varies along with them. Since you can’t change the difficulty setting during the game (something that I’m actually pretty happy about), it’s good to see that the enemies grow stronger when you do. Boss battles are challenging, sometimes infuriatingly so. There’s never a dull moment with The Heartless.

Travelling between the worlds becomes a lot easier once you’ve finished the first few worlds with the addition of a warp gummi to your gummi ship! To travel to new worlds, you still need to blast your way through space-bound enemies, but once you’ve arrived at the new world, you can travel to and from previously seen worlds with ease.

My main issue with the game is the camera. In automatic mode, it’ll do its own thing which can work against you in a battle. I’ve died several times because I haven’t seen an attack coming because the camera is looking at something else. In manual mode, the camera doesn’t feel responsive to the player’s input. It’s easier to use than automatic mode, but that isn’t saying much. From people I’ve asked, the camera has improved since the PS2 version but I’ve really got nothing to compare it too. With the battles being intense and generally involving multiple enemies, a dodgy camera can be the undoing of a good game.

I never really saw the appeal of Kingdom Hearts when it first came out. Mostly because it came out after my PS2 died and I’d bought an Xbox so I didn’t really have a way to play it on my own but with the wonders of technology, I’m able to play, and enjoy this gem of a game. Camera problems aside, being able to fly around the universe with Goofy and Donald and team up with some of my favourite Disney characters is a lot of fun. With some Final Fantasy characters making appearances too, it’s a good introduction to the Final Fantasy world. Once I’ve finished with Kingdom Hearts, I might make a run for some of those games too. What number are they up to these days?

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24-Hour LAN To Raise Money For Typhoon Relief

People can be pretty cool when it comes to helping others in need. So, when Typhoon Haiyan touched down in the Philippines, it wasn’t too long before people started figuring out how they could help. The guys at Atomic and PC & Tech Authority are doing it the only way us gamers know how; 24-hour LAN party.

On December 7th, Atomic headquarters will be become home to a team of gamers playing PC games, console games, mobile games and they say “even the odd card game” in order to raise money to donate to World Vision Australia’s Typhoon Haiyan’s emergency appeal.

According to abc.net.au, the revised death toll in the Philippines has risen to over 4,500 people, leaving families broken and without supplies to keep themselves alive. Atomic and PC Authority hope that for every hour they play, donors will donate $1 or give what they can. Hoping to hit $24 an hour, their goal is $10,000 to donate to World Vision which will be used for short-term and long-term relief.

24-hours of gaming is a pretty big feat when you’re trying to raise money for a good cause. A lot of people see the devastation on the television and want to help, but aren’t sure how to. Atomic and PC Authority are giving people a way to combine their love of gaming with the human need to help our fellow people. I know I’ll definitely be tuning in to watch and donate some money to help people in need.

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