Tag Archives: PS4

Review: Until Dawn (PS4)

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My friends and I have these nights that have become a bit of a tradition in our friend circle. We organise scary movie nights where we’ll binge on the best horror movies we can find until we can’t handle any more, then we binge on Disney movies until we feel better. We’re legendary at the pizza shop near my friend’s house, but that’s a story for another time.

It’s a weird, sadistic pleasure we all enjoy. That explains why I enjoyed every scream-inducing jump scare that Until Dawn has to offer.

Until Dawn is the story of eight high school friends who go back to the cabin they were staying at, when two of their friends (sisters) mysteriously go missing after a prank goes wrong.

Visually, the game looks amazing. Using motion capture with some well-known names (Hayden Panettiere and Peter Storm, just to name a few), the sense of Uncanny Valley isn’t nearly as off-putting as the motion capture in say… LA Noire.

Not only do the characters look realistic, the environments you explore look great, too. Eerie and unsettling, areas in the game only add to the suspense and anxiety you’ll feel during the game.

Sadly, the camera work lets the fantastic environments down. The camera in Until Dawn jumps to give you the best vantage point in the classic horror movie style. When you’re trying to navigate through 3D environments, this type of camera movement can break the immersion and really detract from the tense scene.

The biggest mechanic in Until Dawn uses to push you through the story is called “The Butterfly Effect”. This mechanic relies on the player making split-second decisions to situations and decides the fates of your fellow co-eds. It makes you think “What if I didn’t check his phone?” or “What if I didn’t try to wake up my brother?” Some of these decisions won’t affect your outcome, others will change it dramatically. It works really well with the quick-time events, where a stumble could seal the fate of someone else. Until Dawn combines the use of quick-time events and a brilliant inclusion of PlayStation’s Sixth-Axis motion control with a fantastic score and sound effects. Making a quick-time decision is hard enough when you’re trying to escape a tense situation, but when the controller is ticking loudly and violins are screeching, everything comes together in one anxiety-causing moment.

In the tense circumstances, every action feels like it’s life-or-death, and that’s the point. When you trigger a Butterfly Effect action, white butterflies will appear in the corner of the screen and you can see how this matches up with the story. These decisions also affect your relationship and personality stats. You can go back and review your decisions, along with clues or totems you gather along the way so you can modify your behaviour when you inevitably replay Until Dawn.

Until Dawn is also a massive, dirty cheater. During the game, you’ll be interviewed by Dr. Hill, who becomes increasingly more disturbing as you go through the story. He asks you what you’re more afraid of and the game uses this against you. Essentially, you have yourself to the game on a silver platter. During my interview, I said that I was scared of clowns, more scared of dogs over rats (big bitey vs little jumpy), and needles. The major scare it used was clowns, which made me scream (actual, blood curdling screams) on more than one occasion; much to the amusement of my jerk-ass boyfriend.

Dr. Hill reminds me a lot of the Games Master from the 90’s VHS horror game Nightmare, with most of his NPC interaction happening in changing environments and getting right up in your face. It feels like he’s actually going to crawl out of the TV and berate you in person. He’s a great way to break up the gameplay, but still keep terrified.

This game isn’t without flaws. Until Dawn started to lose me half way through the game when things took a weird turn after the plot twist, when the pacing changed and one plot device being used a little too much for my liking. The device makes sense in the greater scheme of the story, but it jumps from one bad guy to another without much explanation as to why. It also seems to focus on certain characters more than others. I felt myself wondering where one character was after huge repeating scenes with other characters.

The story also lacks in any kind of originality. It’s not necessarily a bad thing, but Until Dawn relies on several horror movie tropes like The Jock, The Bitchy Girl, and The Quiet Nerdy Guy. Any of these characters could be easily found in a remake of The Breakfast Club, if it happened to be set in a Canadian cabin during a blizzard. I did find myself rooting for one particular character, and then I accidentally killed her because I was playing to her personality.

My bad…

Until Dawn managed to scare the pants off me and make me want more. Despite some poor camera movements and a slightly disappointing story, if this game was a movie, I’d pay to see it in cinemas and spill my popcorn all over myself. Definitely something I’ll be replaying again and still screaming like a terrified little child.

Seriously though, fuck. This. Game.

(Review also available on Player Attack)

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Rade Reviews: Dragon Age: Inquisition (PS4) Spoilers maybe?

My opinions of Dragon Age have been coloured a very murky shade of awful by the mess that is Dragon Age: Origins. In fact, just thinking about that game makes me want to go screaming into the night. Dragon Age: Origins felt like it was punishing me for not being a die-hard Dragon Age fan and nothing I did or said could make that better.

It’s surprising, with all that being said, that I’m enjoying Dragon Age: Inquisition so much. There’s the recurring theme in my gaming that I don’t really enjoy the first RPG I play in a series, but get into the second instalment I pick up (please refer to my Skyrim addiction for further evidence.), although I don’t quite get what’s going on.

When a peace conference between the Templars and mages ends with a large explosion opening rifts between the human world and the Fade, the Chantry’s senior cleric, the Divine, and several mages and Templars are killed. The only survivor is your character.

When your character is discovered coming from one of the rifts with no memory of what happened, but a mark on their hand with the ability of closing said rifts, you’re enlisted by former associates of the Divine to establish an Inquisition to find out who created the Breach, close it, and establish order between the Templars and the mages. Not that any of that means much to me. I’m too busy picking flowers and being killed by Dragons to pay attention to any of the lore. That’s where I think Dragon Age really has me pegged though.

I’m not someone who has all the lore stored away in head for easy access, or always knows what’s going on, but it’s not affecting my experience in the game at all. I’m happily playing through the missions with a somewhat minor understanding of what’s going on and that works perfectly fine for me. There’s plenty of well-crafted scenery for me to explore.

Gameplay is very RPG-esque. Although the formula isn’t something you can really change. You can go through your party and select what perks and skills you’d like them to have or you can auto-level them up with the single press of a button, something which I now rely on after accidentally giving my archer a skill which requires her to use daggers. Probably should have paid more attention to what I was doing, but oh well.

Combat gameplay can go two ways. You can just go in arrows blazing, which is generally the way I play. However, you can use their tactical planning mode where gameplay pauses. In this mode you can command each character in battle and decide how they attack, defend and move. In larger battles with more enemies, this mode can be vital. Playing around in this mode in some of the smaller fights to figure out how to use it could come in handy.

Customisation is where you’ll spend an obscene amount of time. Although, I found that the character making screens took a little getting used to. You start with four races to pick from: Dwarves, Elves, Humans and Qunari, then from there on to your class: Mage, Rogue, or Warrior. For reference, Rade is an Elvish Rogue, because she’s a boss.

After you’ve picked out who you’ll be, you can choose what you’ll look like and the only real limit is your imagination. You’ve got sliders and colour wheels for days. The only thing I regret doing with my character is giving her bright purple eyes. She’s kind of pretty, but has these really bizarre purple eyes which ruin everything.

Rade’s weird purple eyes can’t ruin her scripting though. BioWare’s David Gaider once again writes some very excellent dialog for all his characters. When you’re going to spend hundreds of hours (don’t give me that look, this game is going to dig its claws into you and you’re doing to play this through several times) playing this game, crafting out well written characters is important. Each character shouldn’t feel two-dimensional and it’s something that BioWare excel at.

However, it’s a BioWare game, so it doesn’t come without a bug or two. I haven’t come any myself just yet, but a few of my friends have posted on their social media floating books, some hilarious clipping issues and rendering issues. These aren’t as bad as a few other games *cough* Assassin’s Creed *cough*, but these can get frustrating and for a game that looks as polished as Dragon Age: Inquisition, it’s disappointing.

Like I said in the beginning, I’m surprised I’m enjoying Dragon Age: Inquisition as much as I am. Dragon Age: Origins causes me physical pain and it steered me clear of Dragon Age II. The only reason I picked up Dragon Age: Inquisition was sheer curiosity, and it paid off. It’s pretty to look at, I’m invested in the characters and I don’t have to be overly invested in the over-arching lore to understand the story. It’s the perfect game for die-hard Dragon Age fans or people just looking for something to invest their time in.

 

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2014 Gift Guide!

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It’s that time of year again! With Christmas on the horizon, the difficult task of buying gifts becomes obvious. Being the well-skilled shopper that I am, I find buying gifts for my game-orientated friends the worst. It’s like buying shoes for someone without knowing their size.

So in the spirit of the up-coming season, I give you my guide to buying the perfect gamer gift.

Gift cards are the easiest solution for the picky gamer or someone you don’t know very well. Your friend can pick what they want without the risk of buying something said gamer already has or doesn’t want.

Games are a great gift if you know what your friend plays. Steam has a ‘wish list’ system that is a fantastic indicator. Games are ranked in the order that your friend wants them and they show up-to-date prices. If you’re buying a game for the console user, Xbox Live Arcade, PlayStation Network Store and the Wii store offer a range of games that be purchased using a credit card or a point-system.

As far as the consoles go, Xbox One and PS4 bundles are a great choice. EB Games have Xbox One without Kinect + 6 game bundles going for $529, Xbox One with Kinect + 7 games for $599 and their PS4 bundles are just as good. Several different game bundles with the black or white PS4 console available for $598. Other retailers like Big W or JB Hi-Fi will have similar bundles available, so shop around and see what you can get.

Nintendo released brand new 3DS consoles this year and they’re going for $250, gifted along with the new Pokemon Alpha Sapphire or Omega Ruby, Super Smash Bros or The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, you’re going to make any gamer happy.

Big name AAA titles like Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel!, Dragon Age: Inquisition and Far Cry 4 have been reviewing well. If your gamer hasn’t picked up one of the later year release titles, they should definitely be something to check out.

If your gamer doesn’t play video games, try to find your local tabletop games shop. The staff are generally very helpful and friendly. Check out the Youtube series Tabletop, hosted by Wil Wheaton, for some fun board game ideas. Tabletop has given my friends and I some great games to play, including Gloom, Zombie Dice and the friendship-ruining card game Munchkin. If your tabletop gamer like RPG-style games, buying the miniatures they want or a set of really cool dice will get you some quality brownie points.

If your nerd has a game in mind, but it hasn’t been released, offer to buy the pre-order for them. Some pre-orders are quite cheap and you still get some decent loot with it. If they already have a pre-order organised but haven’t paid it off yet, offer to pay the rest off. Some collector’s editions can be upwards of $150 price wise, so buying it or paying it off is always a good idea and who doesn’t want a shiny new figurine for Christmas?

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“Your Feedback Matters” – Microsoft Listen To Criticism and Change Everything.

Hardware developers have no respect for sleeping schedules I tell ya….

Today, Microsoft announced that it would remove the dreaded DRM and used-game policies that everyone has been so anxious about. Previously, your Xbox One would need to check in to the Xbox servers once every 24-hours to verify files. Microsoft tried to calm the waters by saying that the files that would be transferred were so small you could tether your phone to your Xbox for this check-in. Alas, the masses had spoken and they didn’t want to be anywhere near this DRM.

The used game policy was just as confusing and frustrating for consumers (even I’m still trying to get my head around the ex-policy). And that’s partly Microsoft’s fault, they weren’t very clear in explaining how trading and lending games. But they’re now changing the policy so that used games are handled the same way they’re handled on your Xbox 360; whether that’s a good or bad thing.

What’s new? The Xbox One is now region free which is something I’ve wanted for years. For too long have we been punished in Australia for our location and thus, we get games about a month behind the world (which the exception of one or two games to keep the unruly masses at bay) so now, you don’t have to wait. I’m a sucker for pre-order shinies so I might still have to wait, but at least I’ve got the choice to get a game in advance.

There’s an article on Gizmodo that outlines the ways that this change could really suck for the customer. It’s a really good read. I’d suggest going in with an open mind and seeing how it changes your mind on things.

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Sony Vs Microsoft. Who Won? #E3 #SonyE3 #XboxE3

Sony just destroyed Microsoft at E3, although Sony has a pretty average selection of games on launch. Both prices have been confirmed and are as follows:

PS4:
Console: $549
Controller: $99
Games: $118

Xbox One:
Console: $599
Controller: $99
Games: $118

Microsoft did announce a redesigned Xbox 360 which is smaller and quieter than the current models, that your Xbox Gold sub will go across to Xbox One and that you’ll be able to download two free games per month. Also has a partnership with Twitch.TV so you can broadcast your games live.

Sony announced that there won’t be any restrictions on used games, no online authentication and that online multiplayer will now require PlayStation Plus. PS4 is region free. They announced the console would be priced at $399 in the US. Anyone notice the $150 mark up in Australian Price? That’s right, Australian Tax strikes again.

 

Update: EB Games confirms that the $118 price tag on PS4 and Xbox One games is only a placeholder.

[tweet https://twitter.com/EBGamesAus/status/344337172855402496]

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