Hands on: ASUS ROG G20CB (Sponsored)

Pre-built computers for gaming weren’t always a viable option for your hardcore gamer – they just didn’t have the power to run your favourite games. And if you weren’t confident enough to build your own PC, you probably didn’t want to sink some of your hard-earned cash into a puzzle that can go wrong.

Happily, pre-built gaming PC’s are now becoming reliable for gamers who want a “set it and forget it” option. ASUS’s ROG G20CB is a great looking computer, with the power to back it up – and it’s VR Compatible.

I don’t know what I was expecting when it arrived at my house. Was it going to be a huge tower like my gaming rig? Would it be a tiny case, filled to the brim with processing power? Despite the enormous packing box, it was actually somewhere in between.

While the ROG G20CB 9.5L tower matches the aesthetics that the previous ASUS ROG items I’ve reviewed, it’s definitely something special. It looks aerodynamic, masculine and stealthy – which isn’t my jam. But the front panel has twin colour-changing LEDs hidden behind an alien ruins-esque design when the PC is running. It was an odd match to the rather angular edges on the case, but it was a nice thing to catch your eye mid-gaming session.

Around the back you’ve a variety of 2.0 and 3.0 USB ports to ensure the quickest data transfer and enough room for all your peripherals. Alongside a HDMI-out port (more on this later), LAN port, a Kensington Lock (so people don’t run off with your computer at a LAN) and 7.1 audio.

Under the hood, the ROG G20CB I got to play with has an Intel i7 Processor, NVIDIA GeForce GTX1080 8GB, 8GB DDR4 RAM with room to expand up to 32GB RAM and two hard drives (1TB SATA 7200RPM and 512GB SSD). All this hardware makes for a really nice computer.

All of that works together to bring one of the more impressive features for the G20CB. My review computer came with an Oculus Rift headset for some VR gaming goodness.

I’ve played with VR in the past at PAX and it wasn’t the best experience. The Oculus dev kits were awful in hindsight and didn’t sit well with my migraine-prone brain. Luckily, the retail kits are a marked improvement. To really test out the playability of the Oculus, I invited around a few friends to enjoy some games and drinks, and it was definitely a great night. The selection of games I had to pick from wasn’t huge (early access games aren’t my jam), but I’d managed to pick a few winners and the ROG G20CB handled them perfectly. “Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes” was great fun in VR, when you’ve got four people sharing one set of instructions and screaming conflicting things at you.

@kristyyleighh’s boyfriend is being mindfucked by Oculus

A video posted by Rade (@gamer_rade) on

But one game “Emily Wants to Play”, was the most fun to play with the Oculus headset. The horror survival game is based around creepy dolls and jump scares. I’d show you the footage of my boyfriend noping the hell on out of there but the footage seems to have disappeared…

Creepy, right?

This computer isn’t without its faults however. In larger computers, you either have a small, external power supply (think laptop size) or it’s contained within the computer itself. Because the ASUS ROG G20CB case is quite slim and small, the power supply is external and it’s huge. The G20CB power supply unit actually has two separate power supplies to power this beast (180W + 230W). If it was my regular computer, I’d be concerned about it getting quite warm under my desk.

Another issue I had was setting up the Oculus. The computer has 2 HDMI ports; one on the motherboard and one on the GPU – but the one on the GPU comes disabled. This isn’t a huge issue if you only need one HDMI port, or know how to reenable the port on your GPU, but if you’re a “set it and forget it” kind of person (no shame in your game) and you did buy this to use a VR headset, it could become a bit of a pain. This isn’t necessarily an issue with the computer, but I hate finding these things out after the fact and having to waste time fixing a problem that shouldn’t be an issue in the first place.

Consumers may have trouble with the investment needed with the ROG G20CB. The computer I got to test will set you back a cool AUD$3999 – that’s no small amount of cash to part with. The ROG G20CB has been designed to age well and not need as frequent hardware upgrades as your homebrew computer, thus the larger than usual price tag. Again, you’re paying for the “set it and forget it” PC option. If you can get past the price hurdle, this computer would be an investment that I think would make the most hardcore gamers happy.

The last issue I had was a total user fault: It took me 20 minutes, some adult supervision, and a Google search to figure out how I turn it on. As I mentioned above, the front panel of the computer has an intricate design which disguises the power button quite well. I was worried I’d have to email my friends at Asus and tell them I couldn’t review the computer they’d sent me because I couldn’t figure out how it worked! It’s actually quite embarrassing for someone who does this for a living…

The Asus ROG G20CB is a big investment for any gamer, but with a variety of specifications available through the website, you’re able to get the best bang for your buck. While the issues I had were minor (and mostly my fault),it’s still a great computer if you’re just looking for a computer that’s going to stand up to the best games for the next few years without showing its age. It’s sleek, small, and portable. It made a great PC to have attached to our TV in our loungeroom, and would make a great PC for any study or gaming den.

Listen @asusau, my cat has claimed the G20CB as her own. I can’t send it back without her.

A photo posted by Rade (@gamer_rade) on


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