Rade Reviews: Dragon Age: Inquisition (PS4) Spoilers maybe?

My opinions of Dragon Age have been coloured a very murky shade of awful by the mess that is Dragon Age: Origins. In fact, just thinking about that game makes me want to go screaming into the night. Dragon Age: Origins felt like it was punishing me for not being a die-hard Dragon Age fan and nothing I did or said could make that better.

It’s surprising, with all that being said, that I’m enjoying Dragon Age: Inquisition so much. There’s the recurring theme in my gaming that I don’t really enjoy the first RPG I play in a series, but get into the second instalment I pick up (please refer to my Skyrim addiction for further evidence.), although I don’t quite get what’s going on.

When a peace conference between the Templars and mages ends with a large explosion opening rifts between the human world and the Fade, the Chantry’s senior cleric, the Divine, and several mages and Templars are killed. The only survivor is your character.

When your character is discovered coming from one of the rifts with no memory of what happened, but a mark on their hand with the ability of closing said rifts, you’re enlisted by former associates of the Divine to establish an Inquisition to find out who created the Breach, close it, and establish order between the Templars and the mages. Not that any of that means much to me. I’m too busy picking flowers and being killed by Dragons to pay attention to any of the lore. That’s where I think Dragon Age really has me pegged though.

I’m not someone who has all the lore stored away in head for easy access, or always knows what’s going on, but it’s not affecting my experience in the game at all. I’m happily playing through the missions with a somewhat minor understanding of what’s going on and that works perfectly fine for me. There’s plenty of well-crafted scenery for me to explore.

Gameplay is very RPG-esque. Although the formula isn’t something you can really change. You can go through your party and select what perks and skills you’d like them to have or you can auto-level them up with the single press of a button, something which I now rely on after accidentally giving my archer a skill which requires her to use daggers. Probably should have paid more attention to what I was doing, but oh well.

Combat gameplay can go two ways. You can just go in arrows blazing, which is generally the way I play. However, you can use their tactical planning mode where gameplay pauses. In this mode you can command each character in battle and decide how they attack, defend and move. In larger battles with more enemies, this mode can be vital. Playing around in this mode in some of the smaller fights to figure out how to use it could come in handy.

Customisation is where you’ll spend an obscene amount of time. Although, I found that the character making screens took a little getting used to. You start with four races to pick from: Dwarves, Elves, Humans and Qunari, then from there on to your class: Mage, Rogue, or Warrior. For reference, Rade is an Elvish Rogue, because she’s a boss.

After you’ve picked out who you’ll be, you can choose what you’ll look like and the only real limit is your imagination. You’ve got sliders and colour wheels for days. The only thing I regret doing with my character is giving her bright purple eyes. She’s kind of pretty, but has these really bizarre purple eyes which ruin everything.

Rade’s weird purple eyes can’t ruin her scripting though. BioWare’s David Gaider once again writes some very excellent dialog for all his characters. When you’re going to spend hundreds of hours (don’t give me that look, this game is going to dig its claws into you and you’re doing to play this through several times) playing this game, crafting out well written characters is important. Each character shouldn’t feel two-dimensional and it’s something that BioWare excel at.

However, it’s a BioWare game, so it doesn’t come without a bug or two. I haven’t come any myself just yet, but a few of my friends have posted on their social media floating books, some hilarious clipping issues and rendering issues. These aren’t as bad as a few other games *cough* Assassin’s Creed *cough*, but these can get frustrating and for a game that looks as polished as Dragon Age: Inquisition, it’s disappointing.

Like I said in the beginning, I’m surprised I’m enjoying Dragon Age: Inquisition as much as I am. Dragon Age: Origins causes me physical pain and it steered me clear of Dragon Age II. The only reason I picked up Dragon Age: Inquisition was sheer curiosity, and it paid off. It’s pretty to look at, I’m invested in the characters and I don’t have to be overly invested in the over-arching lore to understand the story. It’s the perfect game for die-hard Dragon Age fans or people just looking for something to invest their time in.

 


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